inReach Explorer+ field test

“Handheld Satellite Communicator and GPS Navigation with 100% global Iridium satellite coverage!” That’s how Garmin advertises their inReach Explorer+. When you first start to do longer excursions in the backcountry, good map skills and carrying a charged phone is on top of everyone’s list. But when you start going into very remote terrain or when you are guiding people hours away from the nearest road or phone signal, you want to minimize any possible obstacle to knowing exactly where you are – and you want to maximize your ability to communicate quickly, clearly and with precision. Read the full test report!

The dangers of over commitment and tunnel vision

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Most accidents happen with hikers. That’s right. Not climbers, not alpinists, not mountain bikers… The largest number of people that have serious accidents were simply walking. Of course this only happens to big city fools doing outrageously stupid things right? The truth is that if you go out often enough, you will sooner or later find yourself into some kind of trouble. Over commitment and tunnel vision then become a leading cause for more trouble.
Read the full story!

A Quick start guide to (trail) running

A Quick start guide to (trail) running

So what is this trail running?! Isn’t that freakishly skinny people with lives that aren’t even remotely bearable that don’t run anything shorter than a full marathon? Horrible! They even run uphill! There’s no way this is ever going to be anything I’ll enjoy, let alone do… wrong!

Trail running is a sport where you “run” at a speed of your own choice through a natural environment. Instead of paved roads, running club tracks, or – I can barely stand the thought – treadmills, you go out into the world, looking for tracks that are as diverse and stimulating as possible. Forest trails, fields, hills, sand dunes… and let’s add a little altitude difference to the mix! Read the full story!

Nadri rock climbing performance test & graphs (Excell worksheet. English & Dutch versions)

Nadri rock climbing performance test & graphs (Excell worksheet. English & Dutch versions)

The Nadri test measures which “load” you can handle in the course of an hour. This helps you judge your level of training. It’s not necessarily about “how hard” you can climb, but more about “how much” climbing you can put out in a timeframe. Look at is as a combination of technical difficulty and volume (how much / how fast / per time); The weight you can give to a performance is described in the score table below. Those with analytical minds can use this spreadsheet to measure the volume and intensity of climbing training over longer periods of time in themselves and others. This can be used to adjust training to more efficiënt levels. Nadri stops at 6C+. I’ve extended his line of scoring using the same mathematical increments.

Example: to cross the Aiguille de la Vanoise you need to score 40 to 70 points; for the Pierre Alain-route on Grand Pic de la Meije South wall in the Encrins you need 200 to 240 points.

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